Tag Archives: MIT

Long non-coding RNAs – spatial amplifiers that control nuclear structure and gene expression

Over the past decade, it has become clear that mammalian genomes encode thousands of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), many of which are now implicated in diverse biological processes. Recent work studying the molecular mechanisms of several key examples – including Xist, which orchestrates X chromosome inactivation – has provided new insights into how lncRNAs can control cellular functions by acting ...

Read More »

G-Rich Motif in the lncRNA Braveheart Interacts with a Zinc-Finger Transcription Factor to Specify the Cardiovascular Lineage

lncRNA

Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are an emerging class of transcripts that can modulate gene expression; however, their mechanisms of action remain poorly understood. Here, MIT researchers experimentally determine the secondary structure of Braveheart (Bvht) using chemical probing methods and show that this ∼590 nt transcript has a modular fold. Using CRISPR/Cas9-mediated editing of mouse embryonic stem cells, they find that ...

Read More »

MIT biologists unravel lncRNA structure-to-function relationships

lncRNA

from MIT News by Anne Trafton – Several years ago, biologists discovered a new type of genetic material known as long noncoding RNA. This RNA does not code for proteins and is copied from sections of the genome once believed to be “junk DNA.” Since then, scientists have found evidence that long noncoding RNA, or lncRNA, plays roles in many ...

Read More »

Scientists home in on a short list of interesting RNA ‘machines.’

lncRNA

Computer models plus observations of RNA inside a cell help scientists home in on a short list of interesting RNA ‘machines.’ by Elizabeth Dougherty, MIT News correspondent DNA stores the information of life, proteins provide the action, and in between sits elusive RNA, which serves both as a database of information and as a molecular machine. RNA is more flexible ...

Read More »

The Xist lncRNA Exploits Three-Dimensional Genome Architecture to Spread Across the X Chromosome

lncRNA

Mammalian genomes encode thousands of large noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), many of which regulate gene expression, interact with chromatin regulatory complexes, and are thought to play a role in localizing these complexes to target loci across the genome. A paradigm for this class of lncRNAs is Xist, which orchestrates mammalian X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) by coating and silencing one X chromosome in ...

Read More »

Reading DNA, backward and forward

lncRNA

MIT biologists reveal how cells control the direction in which the genome is read. by Anne Trafton, MIT News Office MIT biologists have discovered a mechanism that allows cells to read their own DNA in the correct direction and prevents them from copying most of the so-called “junk DNA” that makes up long stretches of our genome. Only about 15 ...

Read More »