Monthly Archives: July 2013

Pseudogene lncRNAs are functional regulators of inflammatory signaling

lncRNA

Pseudogenes are thought to be inactive gene sequences, but recent evidence of extensive pseudogene transcription raised the question of potential function. Here researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine discover and characterize the sets of mouse lncRNAs induced by inflammatory signaling via TNFα. TNFα regulates hundreds of lncRNAs, including 54 pseudogene lncRNAs, several of which show exquisitely selective expression ...

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Circulating Long Non-coding RNAs in Plasma of Patients with Gastric Cancer

lncRNA

Researchers at the Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Japan examined the levels of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in the plasma of patients with gastric cancer to assess their clinical significance for diseases diagnosing and monitoring. They investigated the stability of plasma lncRNAs, and then confirmed the appropriateness of the lncRNA assay with a pre-amplification method. The levels of plasma lncRNAs, ...

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lncRNAs and Chromosome Conformation

Large noncoding RNAs can localize to regulatory DNA targets by exploiting the three-dimensional architecture of the genome. Jesse Engreitz Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology Massachusetts Institute of Technology Talk at Biology of Genomes 2013 Cold Spring Harbor, NY May 8, 2013

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Senescence-associated lncRNAs

Noncoding RNAs include small transcripts, such as microRNAs and piwi-interacting RNAs, and a wide range of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). Although many lncRNAs have been identified, only a small number of lncRNAs have been characterized functionally. Here, researchers from the National Institute on Aging sought to identify lncRNAs differentially expressed during replicative senescence. They compared lncRNAs expressed in proliferating, early-passage, ...

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Long non-coding RNAs: A new frontier in the study of human diseases

lncRNA

With the development of whole genome and transcriptome sequencing technologies, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have received increased attention. Multiple studies indicate that lncRNAs act not only as the intermediary between DNA and protein but also as important protagonists of cellular functions. LncRNAs can regulate gene expression in many ways, including chromosome remodeling, transcription and post-transcriptional processing. Moreover, the dysregulation of ...

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CMU Prof receives Kaufman Grant for research on "High-Throughput Probing of Human IncRNA Structure"

lncrna

Press Release: Six Carnegie Mellon Professors Awarded Research Grants From Pittsburgh Foundation’s Charles E. Kaufman Fund Contacts: Ken Walters / 412-268-1151 / walters1@andrew.cmu.edu Chriss Swaney / 412-268-5776 / swaney@andrew.cmu.edu PITTSBURGH—Six Carnegie Mellon University professors are among the first series of grant recipients of The Charles E. Kaufman Foundation, part of The Pittsburgh Foundation, which today announced nearly $1.6 million in ...

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Imprinted Chromatin around DIRAS3 Regulates Alternative Splicing of GNG12-AS1, a Long Noncoding RNA

lncRNA

Imprinted gene clusters are regulated by long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), CCCTC binding factor (CTCF)-mediated boundaries, and DNA methylation. DIRAS3 (also known as ARH1 or NOEY1) is an imprinted gene encoding a protein belonging to the RAS superfamily of GTPases and is located within an intron of a lncRNA called GNG12-AS1. In this study, researchers at Cancer Research UK investigated whether ...

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Differential Expression of Long Non-Coding RNAs in the Livers of Female B6C3F1 Mice

lncRNA

The mammalian genome is transcribed into mRNAs that code for protein as well as a broad spectrum of other noncoding (nc) RNA products. Long ncRNAs (lncRNA), defined as ncRNA species > 200 nucleotides long, are emerging as important epigenetic regulators of gene expression that are involved in a spectrum of biological processes of relevance to toxicology. A team led by ...

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‘Dead’ gene comes to life, puts chill on inflammation, researchers find

 by Bruce Goldman A gene long presumed dead comes to life under the full moon of inflammation, Stanford University School of Medicine scientists have found. The discovery, described in a study published July 23 in eLife, may help explain how anti-inflammatory steroid drugs work. It also could someday lead to entirely new classes of anti-inflammatory treatments without some of steroids’ ...

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