Tag Archives: Stanford University

Gene regulation in the immune system by long noncoding RNAs

lncRNA

Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are emerging as critical regulators of gene expression in the immune system. Studies have shown that lncRNAs are expressed in a highly lineage-specific manner and control the differentiation and function of innate and adaptive cell types. Here, Stanford University researchers discuss mechanisms used by lncRNAs to regulate genes encoding products involved in the immune response, including direct ...

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Novel lincRNA SLINKY is a prognostic biomarker in kidney cancer

lncRNA

Clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCC) show a broad range of clinical behavior, and prognostic biomarkers are needed to stratify patients for appropriate management. Stanford University researchers  sought to determine whether long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) might predict patient survival. Candidate prognostic lincRNAs were identified by mining The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) transcriptome (RNA-seq) data on 466 ccRCC cases (randomized ...

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Genome regulation by long noncoding RNAs

lncRNA

NIH Director’s Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series Dr. Chang’s research addresses how large sets of genes are turned on or off together, which is important in normal development, cancer, and aging. Chang discovered a new class of genes, termed long noncoding RNAs, can control gene activity throughout the genome, illuminating a new layer of biological regulation. He has invented new methods ...

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‘Dead’ gene comes to life, puts chill on inflammation, researchers find

 by Bruce Goldman A gene long presumed dead comes to life under the full moon of inflammation, Stanford University School of Medicine scientists have found. The discovery, described in a study published July 23 in eLife, may help explain how anti-inflammatory steroid drugs work. It also could someday lead to entirely new classes of anti-inflammatory treatments without some of steroids’ ...

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Thesis Defense – Control of microbial susceptibility and chromatin activation of interferon gamma by a long noncoding RNA

Thesis Defense by Antonio Gomez, Kirkegaard Lab, Department of Microbiology & Immunology. When: Thursday, May 2, 2013. 12:00 PM. Approximate duration of 1.0 hour(s). Where: LKSC 120 (Map) Sponsor: Department of Microbiology and Immunology Contact: 725-4753 llewys@stanford.edu Audience: General Public, Faculty/Staff, Students, Alumni/Friends, Members Permalink: http://events.stanford.edu/events/376/37625

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Increased fraction of novel gene structures for long-noncoding RNAs

Precise identification of RNA-coding regions and transcriptomes of eukaryotes is a significant problem in biology. Currently, eukaryote transcriptomes are analyzed using deep short-read sequencing experiments of complementary DNAs. The resulting short-reads are then aligned against a genome and annotated junctions to infer biological meaning. In this study, scientists at Stanford University use long-read complementary DNA datasets for the analysis of ...

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