Search Results for: incrna

cis-Acting Complex-Trait-Associated lincRNA Expression Correlates with Modulation of Chromosomal Architecture

lncRNA

Intergenic long noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) are the largest class of transcripts in the human genome. Although many have recently been linked to complex human traits, the underlying mechanisms for most of these transcripts remain undetermined. Researchers from the University of Lausanne investigated the regulatory roles of a high-confidence and reproducible set of 69 trait-relevant lincRNAs (TR-lincRNAs) in human lymphoblastoid cells ...

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Bioinformatics for Novel Long Intergenic Noncoding RNA (lincRNA) Identification

lncRNA

Long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) , which are larger than 200 nucleotides and transcribed from the intergenic regions of protein coding genes, have been shown by accumulating findings to be widely expressed and extensively functional in many cellular processes. Nevertheless, given their cell/tissue-specificity, there is a need of identifying novel lincRNAs in a given system. To fulfill this purpose, researchers ...

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lincRNAs Display Distinctive Patterns of Transcription and RNA Processing

lncRNA

Numerous long intervening noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) are generated from the mammalian genome by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcription. Although multiple functions have been ascribed to lincRNAs, their synthesis and turnover remain poorly characterized. Here, University of Oxford researchers define systematic differences in transcription and RNA processing between protein-coding and lincRNA genes in human HeLa cells. This is based on ...

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Chromatin environment, transcriptional regulation, and splicing distinguish lincRNAs and mRNAs

lncRNA

While long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) and mRNAs share similar biogenesis pathways, these transcript classes differ in many regards. LincRNAs are less evolutionarily conserved, less abundant, and more tissue-specific, suggesting that their pre- and post-transcriptional regulation is different from that of mRNAs. Here, researchers from Harvard University performed an in-depth characterization of the features that contribute to lincRNA regulation in ...

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Long noncoding RNA (lincRNA), a new paradigm in gene expression control

lncRNA

Long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) are defined as RNA transcripts that are longer than 200 nucleotides. By definition, these RNAs must not have open reading frames that encode proteins. Many of these transcripts are encoded by RNA polymerase II, are spliced, and are poly-adenylated. This final fact indicates that there is a trove of information about lincRNAs in databases such ...

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Inverted repeat Alu elements in the human lincRNA-p21 adopt a conserved secondary structure that regulates RNA function

LincRNA-p21 is a long intergenic non-coding RNA (lincRNA) involved in the p53-mediated stress response. Yale University researchers sequenced the human lincRNA-p21 (hLincRNA-p21) and found that it has a single exon that includes inverted repeat Alu elements (IRAlus). Sense and antisense Alu elements fold independently of one another into a secondary structure that is conserved in lincRNA-p21 among primates. Moreover, the ...

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Long noncoding RNA lincRNA-EPS as a repressor of inflammatory responses

lncRNA

Long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) are important regulators of gene expression. Although lincRNAs are expressed in immune cells, their functions in immunity are largely unexplored. Here, researchers at the University of Massachusetts Medical School identify an immunoregulatory lincRNA, lincRNA-EPS, that is precisely regulated in macrophages to control the expression of immune response genes (IRGs). Transcriptome analysis of macrophages from lincRNA-EPS-deficient ...

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lincRNAs linked to increased children’s risk of blood infection

lncRNA

A team led by Oxford University has identified genes that make certain children more susceptible to invasive bacterial infections by performing a large genome-wide association study in African children. Bacteraemia, bacterial infection of the bloodstream, is a major cause of illness and death in sub-Saharan Africa but little is known about whether human genetics play a part. The leading bacterial ...

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